Visitor Information Publication

Tourism is an integral part of commerce in our city. The mild climate and beautiful beaches draw millions of visitors to Newport Beach each year. With an abundance of water activities to offer, our waters are home to one of the largest pleasure-boat harbors in the world.

In addition to our breathtaking landscape, we have world-class shopping, restaurants and hotels for visitors to enjoy. Whether Newport Beach is your destination for a weeklong seaside vacation or a weekend business conference, our city is a wonderful place in which to work and play.

General Information

SIZE:

Newport Beach is approximately 40 square miles, of which 22 square miles is water. Areas officially incorporated into Newport Beach include Corona del Mar, Balboa Island, Newport Coast, San Joaquin Hills, and Balboa Peninsula.

LOCATION:

Nestled 50 miles south of Los Angeles and 85 miles north of San Diego, Newport Beach has established its own coastal character by combining the best aspects of its well-known southern California neighbors, resulting in an air of “seaside sophistication.”

ELEVATION:

Elevation ranges from sea level to 691.3 feet (210.7 meters).

POPULATION:

Permanent Population – 72,600
Summer Population – 100,000

SISTER CITIES:

Okazaki, Japan
Antibes, France
Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, Mexico

CLIMATE:

Daytime temperatures average 80 degrees during the summer, and only dip to the mid-60s in winter. Evening temperatures seldom fall below 50 degrees year-round. About 10 inches of winter rain falls annually.

Shopping

From the Mediterranean-style walkways of Fashion Island to the small boutiques found in our many villages, shopping enthusiasts can find everything under the sun. With nearly a dozen “neighborhood centers” featuring an array of family-run businesses, Newport Beach caters to both residents and visitors. Many of the city’s shopping areas offer spectacular waterfront views for a truly unique experience.

Restaurants

From the Mediterranean-style walkways of Fashion Island to the small boutiques found in our many villages, shopping enthusiasts can find everything under the sun. With nearly a dozen “neighborhood centers” featuring an array of family-run businesses, Newport Beach caters to both residents and visitors. Many of the city’s shopping areas offer spectacular waterfront views for a truly unique experience.

Accomodations

Newport Beach is the home of two impressive five star hotels with fabulous banquet facilities. Our city also offers excellent affordable hotels and numerous beach cottage rentals. We are conveniently located adjacent to John Wayne (Orange County) Airport, and 15 miles from the Disneyland Resort.

The city’s tourism organization, The Newport Beach Visitors & Conference Bureau, is available to assist with any vacation planning such as group trips or conferences.

Leisure Time Activites

Newport Beach has a vast number of leisure activities to choose from. In addition to relaxing on our beautiful beaches and strolling around our unique villages, there are several outdoor activities to take part in.

Back Bay

Sprawling across approximately 800 acres in Newport Beach is the Back Bay ecological reserve. Upper Newport Bay is one of the few remaining estuaries (where fresh and salt water meet) in Southern California. Home to nearly 200 species of birds, many hikers, bikers, runners and bird watchers enjoy passing their time at this coastal wetland.

Golf Courses

Whether you enjoy practicing your swing on a putting green or teeing off with friends for a relaxing round of golf, Newport Beach provides you with many options. The city is known for its exceptional year-round golfing and offers three public and two private golf courses, some of which have ocean views.

Newport Harbor

Newport Harbor is touted as one of the finest small boat harbors in the world. Over 9,000 vessels are anchored in its tranquil waters, where recreational and commercial boats of all sizes can be found. Both visitors and locals take advantage of the many boat rental and yacht charter opportunities to enjoy the Harbor’s beauty.

Beaches

It comes as no surprise that a major resource in our city is our water—Newport Beach is comprised of 23 square miles of ocean. In fact, Newport Beach leads the county in water quality measures to ensure that beach goers can enjoy our natural resources. From the tide pools at Little Corona to the legendary surf at The Wedge, our beaches are as diverse as the people who visit them.

Water Activities

In addition to visiting our beaches, we have numerous water activities to offer. Board the famous Catalina Flyer for a 75-minute, 26-mile trip to the island of Catalina. Or catch a local charter to go whale watching—December through April are the best months to spot these magnificent creatures. Year-round sportfishing is popular in local waters, and if you’re feeling more adventurous, you can charter a boat to Catalina to catch “the big one.” Authentic Italian gondola cruises are also offered on the bay—gondoliers serenade patrons while winding through the canals of Newport.

Parks, Fields, Gymnasiums, & Community Centers

Newport Beach boasts 47 parks (27 of them public) which are comprised of: 10 community centers, 30 playgrounds, 19 athletic fields, 18 tennis courts, 7 full basketball courts and 8 half-basketball courts. Covering 25 square miles total, there is no shortage of outdoor recreational space when it comes to living in Newport Beach. The City’s Parks & Recreation Department offers a wide variety of classes and outdoor activities in which residents of all ages can participate.

Arts & Culture

From the richly diverse exhibitions at the Orange County Museum of Art to the in-depth historical displays at the Newport Nautical Museum, Newport Beach provides its community with a unique cultural experience. Located only minutes from the Costa Mesa’s Orange County Performing Arts Center and Laguna Beach’s Pageant of the Masters Festival, Newport Beach is central to exploring the Orange County fine arts scene.

Libraries

There are four public libraries serving the residents of Newport Beach. These fine institutions offer everything from book discussions to children’s programs to distinguished speakers.

Airports

Established as an airfield in 1929, John Wayne Airport has grown into a state-of-the-art aviation facility. John Wayne Airport offers Orange County residents, tourists, and business travelers 11 commercial carriers, three commuter airlines, and 23 non-stop destinations. With plans to add six additional gates in the next decade, the airport is poised to continue providing high quality service for years to come. John Wayne Airport is centrally located in Orange County with convenient access to hotels, conference centers and tourist destinations. The terminal provides easy access to air and ground transportation and spacious baggage claim and waiting areas. Serving 9.6 million passengers annually, John Wayne Airport works every day to ensure business and leisure travelers receive the best customer service.

Other airports located in close proximity to Newport Beach are: Long Beach, LAX and Ontario.

Freeways

Three interstate highways intersect Newport Beach: the 73 runs North-South, the 55 runs East-West, and the 1 (Pacific Coast Highway) runs North-South along the coast. These interstates are easily accessible to residents and visitors, and conveniently connect with freeways to neighboring Los Angeles and San Diego Counties.

Trains

Amtrack lines run through Irvine and Santa—each of which is 10 miles from Newport Beach. Other nearby stations are: Anaheim, San Juan Capistrano and the San Clemente Pier.

Public Transportation

The Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) maintains over 20 bus stops in the Newport Beach area. Our city also has a free “park and ride facility” (used by carpoolers and transit riders) on the corner of MacArthur Boulevard and San Joaquin Road.

There are 10 Metrolink stations located in Orange County. Those closest to Newport Beach are: Irvine, Santa Ana and San Clemente. OCTA also offers a free destination connecting bus service, StationLink, from several of the Metrolink stations.

The City of Newport Beach began as an area with less than 400 people when it was incorpo­rated on September 1, 1906. Salt mining, canning and fishing were early area industries; sport fishing, yacht building and brokering followed in later decades.

Projects such as harbor dredging and jetty construction began around the turn of the century, but were delayed by World War I and economic depression. It was not until the 1920s that a substantial effort for harbor development was implemented.

Though Newport played an important role in World War II—local shipyards worked around the clock—the city didn’t flourish as a vacation destination until after the war. Luxury hotels and motels were built to house visitors, and permanent residents soon followed, remodeling beach cottages into lavish homes.

Today, at almost 100 years old, the city is a year-round bustling business and residential community numbering over 80,000 people. The city is comprised of several small “villages,” each with its own purpose and personality.

Home to a world-famous recreational area surrounded by one of the busiest small boat harbors in the world, Newport Beach has grown tremendously over the years. The city boasts some of the nation’s leading businesses in financial services, communications, research, electronics, science, medicine and development.

Local Government

City Government

The Newport Beach City Council reviews, directs, and legislates on matters of land use, finance, and general governance. Council members also serve on committees to review specialized areas and make recommendations to the full City Council. Each of the seven members is elected by the entire community to a four-year term, and can serve a maximum of two terms.

Every even-numbered year three to four members residing in separate districts are elected. Each election year, the Council elects two of its members to serve as Mayor and Mayor Pro Tem. The Newport Beach City Council directly employs the City Manger, who serves as the chief executive officer of the City.

The Council regularly meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month in the City Hall Council Chambers. The public is invited to speak on all issues.